The effect of 12 weeks basic malaysian commando training on physical characteristics of successful commando candidates

  • Azlan Derwish Faculty of Sports Science and Coaching, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Tanjong Malim, Perak, Malaysia
  • Nur Ikhwan Mohamad Faculty of Sports Science and Coaching, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Tanjong Malim, Perak, Malaysia
  • Nor Fazila Abd Malek Faculty of Sports Science and Coaching, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Tanjong Malim, Perak, Malaysia
Keywords: Physical fitness, comando, training program

Abstract

This research was undertaken to determine the physical characteristics among successful soldiers participating in the Basic Commando Course series 1/AK 2014 for 12 weeks, at Sungai Udang Camp, Malacca. A total of 37 male soldiers who had passed the commando practice test were selected to participate in this research, with special approval from the Malaysian Armed Forces Training Base. The anthropometric data of the body and fitness levels, were taken before, during and after the entire duration of the training. The successful commando candidates (commando trainees) aged 22.3±2.85 years, with a mean height of 1.71±0.03 m, mean weight of 60.76±5.18 kg, mean BMI of 22.02±1.38 kg/m2, and mean waist circumference of 68.92±2.48 cm. All physical fitness parameters showed a decrease in the level of physical fitness from the beginning to the end of the study period. In conclusion, the Malaysian commando selection training for twelve weeks produced a significant negative impact on the level of fitness of the military personnel involved. These study findings demonstrate the need for a specific recovery program after the commando’s training session, for the welfare of members and to ensure that the physical preparedness of the trainees has returned back to its pre-training maximum level.

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Published
2020-11-14
How to Cite
Derwish, A., Mohamad, N. I., & Abd Malek, N. F. (2020). The effect of 12 weeks basic malaysian commando training on physical characteristics of successful commando candidates. Jurnal Sains Sukan & Pendidikan Jasmani, 9(2), 25-30. https://doi.org/10.37134/jsspj.vol9.2.4.2020